This is an unpublished draft preview that might include content that is not yet approved. The published website is at w3.org/WAI/.

Selecting Authoring Tools

Introduction

There are two parts to the accessibility of authoring tools:

On this page, we will list accessibility considerations for both of these parts. They can have their own, distinct benefits.

The features listed under “editing experience” and “output” map to ATAG success criteria (A and AA level). They sometimes include examples from Implementing ATAG 2.0.

Accessibility features in authoring tools

Editing experience: for content editors

Output: for end users

Further Considerations

These are some more things to look for when choosing an authoring tool that meets your (organisations’s) accessibility needs:

Accessibility statement provided

Most authoring tools conform only partly to accessibility guidelines. They may provide an accessibility statement that states what to expect from their product’s accessibility.

Governance of accesibility

Authoring tool products are likely regularly improved and updated. Updates could break accessibility, and it is recommended to check with the vendor what their process is for ensuring accessibility throughout their product’s lifecycle.

Some questions to ask:

Other features

The Authoring Tools List also lets you filter based on cost model, license and technology.

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This is an unpublished draft preview that might include content that is not yet approved. The published website is at w3.org/WAI/.